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Listings: 1 to 17 of 17
1.  
Lineal Descendant: being in the direct line of descent from an ancestor.
2.  
Consanguinity is a term meaning blood relationship.
3.  
Cousin: in early American history, a cousin was a relative by blood or marriage of any degree outside the immediate family.
4.  
An ancestor is a person from whom you are descended.
5.  
A descendant is a person who is descended from an ancestor.
6.  
A common ancestor is the mutual ancestor of two or more persons.
7.  
A collateral relative is someone with whom you share a common ancestor but who is not in your direct line.
8.  
Daughter-in-Law: in early American history, a daughter-in-law could be a step-daughter or the wife of a son.
9.  
Son-in-Law: in early American history, a son-in-law referred to either a step-son or the husband of a daughter.
10.  
Son-in-Law: in early American history, a son-in-law referred to either a step-son or the husband of a daughter.
11.  
The use of the terms "Junior" and "Senior" did not always mean the "son of" or "father of." Sometimes it referred to the younger and elder of two persons with the same name living in the same locality. It might also refer to uncle and nephew.
12.  
Relict: refers to a widow or widower.
13.  
Uxor: refers to a widow or widower.
14.  
First cousins are the people in your family who have two of the same grandparents as you. They are the children of your aunts and uncles.
15.  
Third cousins have the same great-great-grandparents as you.
16.  
Fourth cousins have the same great-great-great grandparents as you.
17.  
When the word "removed" is used to describe a relationship, it indicates that the two people are from different generations. The words "once removed" mean that there is a difference of one generation. "Twice removed" means that there is a two-generation difference.